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Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Federal prosecutors in New York charged French investment bank Societe Generale with conspiring to violate the Trading with the Enemy Act for processing billions of dollars in transactions for Cuban banks.

Societe Generale agreed to pay a $1.3 billion fine as part of a deferred prosecution agreement. The amount represents one of the largest penalties ever imposed on a financial institution for violating U.S. sanctions, according to federal prosecutors.

Between 2004 and 2010 prosecutors said Societe Generale arranged $13 billion in transactions that should have been rejected, blocked or stopped for investigation because of U.S. rules about trade with Cuba.

In a related action, the New York State Department of Financial Services fined Societe Generale $420 million for handling billions of dollars in illegal transactions with Cuba, Iran, Libya and Sudan.

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Hannah Bronfman at the Girlboss Rally. Cindy Ord/Getty Images for GirlBoss Rally NYC 2018(NEW YORK) -- Over a 1,000 women from 31 countries gathered in New York City this weekend for the GirlBoss Rally, a two-day women's career and networking conference organized by Sophia Amoruso's Girlboss platform.

The GirlBoss Rally featured panels on topics ranging from equal pay, building confidence and how to build a side hustle. Female leaders including Arianna Huffington, Brooklyn Decker, actress and co-founder of Finery, and Rent the Runway co-founder Jennifer Hyman, were on hand to answer questions. The goal: to galvanize a community of women in building their career dreams.

Amoruso founded GirlBoss in 2014 after experiencing her own failures at her first company Nasty Gal. The CEO always wanted to create a space for women within the community and provide resources to thrive professionally.

In January, the company is launching its own version of LinkedIn, built for millennial women to network and make connections.

GMA talked to Amoruso and panelists about the top career mistakes women make and how they can avoid the traps.

Top mistake women make in being a Girlboss: Sophia Amoruso, Founder and CEO, GirlBoss


“The biggest mistake is thinking our failures are somehow unique,” Amoruso told GMA. "If you’re not failing every day you’re not taking enough risks.”

Instead, Amoruso suggests, “Reach out, share your story. I’m trying to do that and we want that happening on every stage here and it makes us all feel so much less alone. So find other people and have honest conversations."

Top mistake women make in networking: Landit founder and CEO Lisa Skeete Tatum


Lisa Skeete Tatum's mission is to help women define success on their own terms and help them navigate the career landscape with her company, a technology platform called LandIt. While navigating a career, a lot of women make mistakes when it comes to networking, she said.

“The biggest mistake women make in networking is focusing and looking only for a mentor,” Tatum said. “What I really want women to focus on is getting that sponsor. A sponsor is someone who opens doors for you, advocates for you when you’re not in the room and helps you see opportunities around the corner. It is the difference maker when it comes to your career, opportunities and leveraging your network.”

How to get a sponsor? "You have to be visible and people have to see the value that you are bringing," she said.

She added, "You want to make sure you keep your ask really small. So when you reach out to a sponsor, you are coming to talk to them for 15-20 minutes about something specific that you know they can deliver. And then you follow up."

Top mistake women make in being negotiating their pay: Claire Wasserman, Ladies Get Paid


Ladies Get Paid founder Claire Wasserman, who hosts her own conference, "Get Money Get Paid," said she hears from thousands of women that they're not making what they “deserve.”

"You’re not going to make the money because you deserve it,” Claire Wasserman told GMA.

You have to make a compelling case about your accomplishments instead, she explained. "Tell the story in a way as if you were talking about a scene in the movie with high stakes and the most important part is to share your impact,” she said.

She went on, "When you make your case, it’s not just 'I worked hard.' Be as clear and detailed as possible to show what you did and how it affected the bottom of the line of the company."

Top mistake women make in building their brand: Jennifer Hyman, Rent the Runway co-Founder and CEO

As CEO and co-founder of the Rent the Runway, Jennifer Hyman changed the way women shop and think about clothes when she introduced her clothing rental business in 2009.

Despite the popularity of her beloved company and brand, you may not know who she is – and she is just fine with that.

"Often ... women feel like they need to put 100 percent of themselves out there and they need their personal lives to become their brands," Hyman told GMA.

Hyman offers this advice instead: "If I could serve as an example to a set of women, that you don’t have to make that choice if you don't want to. You can have a brand that is all about your company that’s inherently different and separate than the life you lead personally.”

Hyman, who participated in the GirlBoss Rally panel on "Building a Billion Dollar Empire," also noted don't be afraid to fail.

"The realness of failure, the realness of resilience of stepping up after those failures and putting one foot in front of the other and continuing to build something new is the most important human quality," she said. "It’s not just an important quality in business, but resilience is the most important quality in life.”

Top mistake women make in wellness: Hannah Bronfman, DJ, Founder HBFIT and Brand Ambassador

Hannah Bronfman has turned her passion for wellness into a career with HBFIT, amassing over 480,000 followers on her own Instagram page. Her followers tune in to Hannah’s latest ventures on all things heath, beauty and fitness.

“One of the top mistakes women make in their wellness routine is really trying to implement too much at once,” Bronfman told GMA.

Instead, Bronfman suggests, “I think it’s much easier to implement one thing at a time. You want to be able to understand how your body is reacting to these types of things, these types of changes. If you are doing it all at once you don’t know what’s particularly working or making you feel a certain way.”

She added, “The whole point of wellness and changing your routine is understanding how you feel.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Starting Monday you can not only order all your holiday presents on Amazon, but also get a full-sized, fresh Christmas tree delivered to your doorstep as well.

The tech site CNET and Good Morning America got a first look at the process.

“Everything is easy to order on Amazon, so I think it makes a lot of sense for people who are already doing a lot of shopping on Amazon,” Sharon Profis, the executive editor at CNET, told GMA.

At the CNET Smart Home in San Francisco, the tree from Amazon was delivered by a courier, and came in a box and wrapped in Twine.

Amazon said customers can order everything from a small, Charlie Brown-esque tree to one up 7 feet tall, and they will range in price from $20 to $110 depending on which type you choose.

The one delivered to the CNET office costs $110.

With free Prime shipping, consumers can expect to get their trees within three to seven business days, based on their location. The tree delivery package will also include care instructions, tree preservative and a biodegradable bag for the tree after the holidays are over.

"It looks really good," Profis commented. "In fact, I thought it was fake at first because it came out so fresh."

The trees come from local growers in North Carolina and Michigan, according to Amazon.

Natalie Sare, the owner of Santa's Tree Farm in Half Moon Bay, California, however, is a proponent of supporting your local Christmas tree farms each season.

Sare sells all their trees for just $65, but adds that there is another element that Amazon just can't deliver: the experience and tradition of going to a farm and picking out your tree each year.

"Parents say these are the memories their kids are going to remember," Sare told GMA. "Walking through the field, cutting down the tree together and putting it on the car."

Ultimately, the consumer's choice this holiday season may come down to the traditional joy of the experience, versus the one-click ease of home delivery.

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Nissan(TOKYO) -- Nissan Motor's chairman and another top executive have been arrested in Japan on fraud charges.

In a statement Monday, Nissan said an internal investigation found that for several years its chairman, Carlos Ghosn, and representative director, Greg Kelly, “have been reporting compensation amounts in the Tokyo Stock Exchange securities report that were less than the actual amount, in order to reduce the disclosed amount of Carlos Ghosn's compensation.”

“Also, in regards to Ghosn, numerous other significant acts of misconduct have been uncovered, such as personal use of company assets, and Kelly's deep involvement has also been confirmed,” the automaker added in its statement.

Both Ghosn and Kelly have since been fired.

In a news conference Monday in Tokyo, Nissan CEO Hiroto Saikawa said he feels disappointment and frustration.

“On behalf of the company, I would like to express my deep apologies,” Saikawa said, speaking through a translator.

“We need to really look back on what happened seriously and take immediate and fundamental countermeasures to solve this,” he added.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- If you're more committed to stuffing your shopping bag than your face, then check out all the stores open on Thanksgiving and Black Friday below.

Turkey day hours can get confusing with special doorbuster deals bleeding into Black Friday, so make sure to check your store's location to see if it will remain open between the two days.

Bass Pro Shops
Thanksgiving Day: 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Black Friday: 5 a.m. - 11 a.m.

Belk
Thanksgiving Day: 4 p.m. - 1 a.m. Friday
Black Friday: 6 a.m. - 10 p.m.

Best Buy
Thanksgiving Day: 5 p.m. - 1 a.m. Friday
Black Friday: 8 a.m. - 10 p.m.

Big Lots
Thanksgiving Day: 7 a.m. - midnight
Black Friday: Opens 6 a.m.

Costco
Thanksgiving Day: Closed
Black Friday: 9 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Dick’s Sporting Goods
Thanksgiving Day: 6 p.m. - 2 a.m.
Black Friday: 5 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Home Depot
Thanksgiving Day: Closed
Black Friday: Opens 6 a.m.

JCPenney
Thanksgiving Day 2 p.m. through 10 p.m. on Black Friday

Kohl’s
Thanksgiving Day 5 p.m. through Black Friday until 1 p.m.

Kmart
Thanksgiving Day: 6 a.m. - midnight
Black Friday: 6 a.m. - 10 p.m.

Macy’s
Thanksgiving Day: 5 p.m. - 2 a.m.
Black Friday: 6 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Nordstrom
Thanksgiving Day: Closed
Black Friday: 8 a.m. - 10 p.m.

Old Navy
Thanksgiving Day 3 p.m. through Black Friday at 10 p.m.

Sears
Thanksgiving Day: Opens 6 p.m.
Black Friday: 5 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Target
Thanksgiving Day: 5 p.m. - 1 a.m.
Black Friday: Opens 7 a.m.

Walmart
Thanksgiving Day: Opens 6 p.m.
Black Friday: Hours vary by location

Ulta
Thanksgiving Day: 6 p.m. - 2 a.m.
Black Friday: 6 a.m. - 10 p.m.

Victoria's Secret
Thanksgiving Day: Opens 6 p.m.
Black Friday: 6 a.m. - 10 p.m.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Monopoly is targeting millennials and actual millennials are sounding off.

On the box, Mr. Monopoly appears to be snapping a selfie while wearing a participation award and ear buds. The mascot is also holding some sort of coffee drink, arguably poking fun at millennials' love for lattes.

The board includes "Bike Share" spaces and no real estate available for purchase -- presumably due to the game's tagline: "No real estate. You can't afford it anyway."

Hasbro released this version of the board game earlier this year but, recently, Millennials have been expressing feelings via Twitter.

One posted, "Can you provide the URL for the Hasbro-official website featuring 'Monopoly for Millennials,' where you trash on my age demographic because baby boomers caused an economic catastrophe that rendered us financially impotent for a decade? Thanks!"

Another vented: "The rules are simple, you start with no money, you can’t afford anything, the board is on fire for some reason and everything is your fault."

Hasbro said in a statement that it created the game to poke fun at the oft-teased generation.

"We created Monopoly for Millennials to provide fans with a lighthearted game that allows Millennials to take a break from real life and laugh at the relatable experiences and labels that can sometimes be placed on them," the company said. "With many of us being Millennials ourselves, we understand the seemingly endless struggles and silly generalizations that young Millennials can face...Whether you are a lifestyle vlogger, emoji lover or you make your 'side hustle' selling vegan candles, Monopoly for Millennials is for you!"

Game pieces include a hashtag and emoji, but hopefuls on Twitter were rooting for a ripe avocado.

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Billionaire businessman and philanthropist Michael Bloomberg is donating $1.8 billion to his alma mater, Johns Hopkins University, in an effort to help lower and middle income students gain access to college.

The donation, the largest contribution ever made to an education institution in the U.S., will be devoted exclusively to undergraduate financial aid, according to a joint press release by Johns Hopkins and Bloomberg's charitable organization, Bloomberg Philanthropies.

As a direct result of the endowment, Johns Hopkins will be able to permanently commit to "need-blind admissions," which will admit the highest-achieving students from all backgrounds, regardless of their ability to pay, according to the university.

In addition, the Baltimore-based school will be able to offer no-loan financial aid packages, reduce contributions for families who qualify for financial aid, provide "comprehensive student support," and increase the enrollment of Pell grant eligible students, which will "build a more socioeconomically diverse student body," Johns Hopkins said in a statement.

In an op-ed published in The New York Times Sunday, Bloomberg wrote that "no qualified high school student should ever be barred entrance to a college based on his or her family's bank account."

"Yet, it happens all the time," Bloomberg wrote.

Bloomberg wrote that high-achieving applicants who come from families with lower and middle incomes are "routinely denied seats" that are saved for "students whose families have deeper pockets."

"This hurts the son of a farmer in Nebraska as much as the daughter of a working mother in Detroit," he wrote, adding that "America is at its best" when people are rewarded "based on the quality of their work, not the size of their pocketbook."

Bloomberg, who wrote that his father never made more than $6,000 a year as a bookkeeper and he needed a National Defense student loan in order to attend college, graduated from Johns Hopkins in 1964 and made his first contribution of $5 to the school in 1965, according to the press release. In 2013, he pledged $350 million to the university toward cross-disciplinary education and financial aid, according to Forbes.

Before this donation, Bloomberg had already donated a total of $1.5 billion to the university.

The university is also aiming to address the issue of college "under-matching," in which high school students from middle and lower income backgrounds are not matched with competitive college choices but implementing an "extensive outreach and recruitment program to ensure that academically qualified students from middle and low income backgrounds understand that a world-class education ... is attainable and affordable."

Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels said Bloomberg's donation "affirms his believe in the promise of this country and the power of accessible higher education," describing it as "unprecedented and transformative."

"Our university was founded in 1876 by a visionary $7 million gift from the Baltimore merchant Johns Hopkins. When it was announced, it was the largest gift of its kind. It created America’s first research university and changed the face of American higher education," Daniels said in a statement. "With today’s announcement of Mike Bloomberg’s $1.8 billion investment in financial aid, history has repeated itself."

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iStock/Thinkstock(PARIS) -- Scientists from 60 countries voted in a historic event in Versailles, France on Friday to change the definition of the kilogram, basing it on electric currents rather than a single solid object.

The decision, made at the General Conference on Weights and Measurements, will retire the object known as "Le Grand K," a small cylindrical ingot made of platinum-iridium that has been used for more than 130 years to define a kilogram.

Le Grand K is stored at the International Bureau of Weights and Measurement in a vault, where it stands within three bell jars. Three keys are required to access it, and each one is held by a different person. Yet, despite its heavy security, the cylinder has begun to wear away, causing slight inaccuracies in the way we define and measure a kilogram.

The new definition will rely on the Planck constant, a fundamental constant used in quantum physics much like the speed of light is fundamental in Albert Einstein's theory of relativity.

"It describes the size of the packets of energy... that atoms and other particles use to absorb and emit energy," according to a statement from the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

“The current kilogram mass exerts a specific amount of force in Earth’s gravity,” NIST said. “The revised definition replaces this determination of mechanical force with an electromagnetic measurement tied to the Planck constant and based on electrical current and voltage.”

Relying on a natural constant to define kilogram will pave the way for more accurate and precise work, particularly in the fields of science and technology, said Barry Inglis, director of the International Committee for Weights and Measurements, in a statement.

For the average person, however, the new definition shouldn't make much of a difference.

In addition to redefining the kilogram, the scientists voted on Friday to redefine three other base units from the International Systems of Units: the ampere, the kelvin and the mole.

The changes will be effective starting May 20, 2019.

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Hasbro(NEW YORK) -- Monopoly is targeting millennials and actual millennials are sounding off.

Hasbro released this version of the board game earlier this year, but recently, Gen Y has been expressing feelings via Twitter.

"Whoever has the most debt gets to go first," one tweeted.

@Hasbro Can you provide the URL for the Hasbro-official website featuring "Monopoly for Millennials," where you trash on my age demographic because baby boomers caused an economic catastrophe that rendered us financially impotent for a decade? Thanks! pic.twitter.com/wmm0WQwnld

— Steven Briggs (@TrnDaBeatAround) November 11, 2018

“Whoever has the most debt gets to go first” #MonopolyforMillennials pic.twitter.com/cmEz0N7v4g

— Kevin (@kwprime) November 15, 2018

"Let’s play a game of MILLENNIAL MONOPOLY," another wrote. "The rules are simple, you start with no money, you can’t afford anything, the board is on fire for some reason and everything is your fault."

Monopoly for Millennials is currently being sold in Walmart stores for $19.82, but is not listed on Hasbro's website.

Hasbro said in a statement that it created the game to poke fun at the oft-teased generation.

"We created Monopoly for Millennials to provide fans with a lighthearted game that allows Millennials to take a break from real life and laugh at the relatable experiences and labels that can sometimes be placed on them," the company said. "With many of us being Millennials ourselves, we understand the seemingly endless struggles and silly generalizations that young Millennials can face (and we can’t even!). Whether you are a lifestyle vlogger, emoji lover or you make your “side hustle” selling vegan candles, Monopoly for Millennials is for you!"

What should be on the board of #MillennialMonopoly ?
I say #CraftBeer and something that's #glutenfree pic.twitter.com/4IeMJbEFAV

— Chris Walker (@WalkerRadio678) November 13, 2018

#millennialmonopoly is $19.82 at Walmart. No millennial is gonna waste their money on a board game; we have other uses for our money: bills, debt, food, etc.

What are we gonna do anyways, play monopoly by ourselves in our parent’s basements? #wild pic.twitter.com/6EfymE6Duo

— Steve Juliff (@liljuliff) November 15, 2018

On the box, Mr. Monopoly appears to be snapping a selfie while wearing a participation award and ear buds. The mascot is also holding some sort of coffee drink, arguably poking fun at us millennials' love for lattes.

The board includes "Bike Share" spaces and no real estate available for purchase -- presumably due to the game's tagline: "No real estate. You can't afford it anyway."

So, I’m a #Millennial who can’t afford to save for a house or even rent somewhere because rent per month is more money than money I get per month and I’m single so no second income to help, but I also think #Monopolyformillennials is hilarious. #Monopoly #MillennialMonopoly

— Wavey Cowpar ~ (@WaveyCowpar) November 14, 2018

While some expressed offense, others found humor in the theme.

"What should be on the board of #MillennialMonopoly? I say #CraftBeer and something that's #glutenfree," one tweeted.

"Pass go and collect 200.......then give 180 back for bills"

Community Chest: "Make student loan payment of 300"

Chance: "Get pestered by adults for not having children and a house by 27, pay stress tax"

*Goes Bankrupt*: "Lol you think the games over?"#MillennialMonopoly pic.twitter.com/wyaueZooPs

— Steven (@SteveLo510) November 11, 2018

"Laughed so hard I fell off my dinosaur," another wrote in a Walmart review.

Game pieces include a hashtag and emoji, but hopefuls on Twitter were rooting for a ripe avocado.

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Facebook(NEW YORK) -- Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg hunkered down and attempted to defend his leadership of the social media giant amid reporting that detailed how the company failed to effectively combat fake news and Russian political meddling.

The accusations were detailed in a year-long investigative report, "Delay, Deny and Deflect: How Facebook’s Leaders Fought Through Crisis" published by the New York Times on Wednesday.

One of the more damaging aspects of the Times report was that Facebook hired a Republican-linked D.C. consulting firm to plant negative stories about Facebook's competitors and critics. The move seemingly contradicts the company's public claims that it is transparent about how it handles fake stories on the platform.

Since the 2016 elections, Facebook has launched several "transparency" initiatives over the past year.

Announcing a campaign targeting accountability for ads in June, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg said, "we are providing much more transparency than any other advertising platform, either online or offline."

Facebook fired the D.C. consulting firm, Definers Public Affairs, on Wednesday. Zuckerberg, in a conference call with reporters Thursday, repeatedly claimed he did not know that the company had been hired, trying to distinguish Facebook's culture with repeated references to "Washington, D.C., firms."

"I learned about this relationship when I read The New York Times piece yesterday. I looked into whether this was the kind of firm we should be working with. And we’re not working with them," Zuckerberg told reporters. "This type of firm might be normal in Washington but it’s not the kind of firm I want Facebook to be working with."

Zuckerberg also defended his key lieutenant, Sandberg.

"I want to be clear, I mentioned a couple of times I was not in the loop on some of these decisions, and Sheryl was also not involved and she learned about this the same time as I did," Zuckerberg said. "Overall Sheryl is doing great work for this company, she’s been a great partner to me and will continue to be a great partner to me.”

Sandberg commented on Facebook late Thursday, saying she "wanted to address some of the claims that have been made in the last 24 hours."

"On a number of issues -- including spotting and understanding the Russian interference we saw in the 2016 election -- Mark and I have said many times we were too slow. But to suggest that we weren’t interested in knowing the truth, or we wanted to hide what we knew, or that we tried to prevent investigations, is simply untrue," she wrote. "The allegations saying I personally stood in the way are also just plain wrong. This was an investigation of a foreign actor trying to interfere in our election. Nothing could be more important to me or to Facebook."

The company has repeatedly admitted it had not done enough to prevent the spread of fake news and political manipulation on its site, which executives repeated on Thursday through multiple press statements and on a call with reporters.

"But to suggest we weren't interested in knowing the truth, or that we wanted to hide what we knew is simply untrue," Zuckerberg said at the beginning of the call, which was originally meant to tout the company's progress cracking down on fake accounts, hate speech, terrorist propaganda, bullying and child pornography.

For example, Facebook removed over 1.6 billion fake accounts between April and September of this year, the company reported on Thursday.

Instead, the call turned into a crisis management session in which Zuckerberg and other executives defended their decisions amid a barrage of media questions related to the claims in the Times story and continuing problems with bad actors on the platform.

"There are lot of things I’d do differently in retrospect," Zuckerberg said about the company's actions regarding the election meddling.

Earlier in the day, Facebook fought back against the Times story.

"The story asserts that we knew about Russian activity as early as the spring of 2016 but were slow to investigate it at every turn. This is not true," Facebook wrote in a statement. "We also saw some new behavior when [Russia-linked group] APT28-related accounts, under the banner of DC Leaks, created fake personas that were used to seed stolen information to journalists. We shut these accounts down for violating our policies.'"

When asked if Facebook monitors the messages of journalists on its platform, Zuckerberg replied, "Absolutely not."

Zuckerberg effectively said he would not step down as chairman of his board of directors when asked specifically by reporters. Many corporate governance experts said it's an inherent conflict of interest for a CEO to also be chairman.

"I don’t think that specific proposal is the right way to go," he said, when asked if he'd give up the chairman role.

Activist investors had already been pushing for Zuckerberg to step down as chair.

"I think The New York Times reporting illustrates exactly why we are recommending an independent board chair. The fact that they kept the board in the dark for so long shows us that an independent board chair is necessary," Jonas Kron, whose company Trillium Investments owns 53,000 shares of Facebook, told ABC News. "We knew that already, but the report should remove any lingering doubts."

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- If you plan to hit the road this Thanksgiving, there’s something to be thankful for: lower gas prices.

The national average for a gallon of regular unleaded gas is down to $2.65 -- that’s a drop of 23 cents from a month ago.  

In some states -- like Missouri, Oklahoma, Ohio, Louisiana and Texas -- drivers may even be able to find gas below $2 a gallon.

Gas prices are expected to continue dropping into the Thanksgiving holiday, when 54 million Americans are expected to hit the road.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- More than 30.6 million people across the country are expected to fly during the Thanksgiving holiday this year and it could set a record.

The current record was set when an estimated 29 million passengers flew during the 2017 travel period, which this year spans from Friday, Nov. 16 through Tuesday, Nov. 27.

Transportation and security officials have said they are prepared for the rush, but travelers should expect increased crowds throughout the 12-day period.

The Sunday after Thanksgiving is projected to be the busiest when an estimated 3.06 million passengers will take to the skies, according to Airlines for America, a trade organization for some of the largest U.S. carriers. The Wednesday before Thanksgiving could be the second busiest with about 2.93 million travelers. The lightest travel day is expected to be Thanksgiving day with an estimated 1.73 million passengers.

To accommodate, U.S. airlines will be adding 158,000 seats per day for an additional 137,000 daily passengers by adding more flights and using bigger aircraft, with a total of 2.94 million seats available each day. The traveling forecast predicts 2.55 million people per day during the two weeks.

The Transportation Security Administration said it is ready to handle the crowds.

A shift toward automation and biometric technology by the agency will help get passengers on their planes faster and safer, TSA Administrator David Pekoske told reporters at a briefing. An additional 80 canine teams and more than 1,200 TSA officers will be manning the checkpoints over the holiday travel period.

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Riccardo Savi/Getty Images for Concordia Summit(NEW YORK) -- Luxury brand Dior and actress Jennifer Lawrence are facing claims of cultural appropriation amid backlash from a recent ad campaign.

The actress, who started working with the French fashion house in 2012, and has since starred in multiple campaigns for the label, is featured in its Cruise 2019 campaign. Dior said the inspiration for the collection was, "the escaramuzas of Mexico," female equestrians who take part in a competitive, rodeo-like sport called charreada.

"With their strong, sculpted bodies clad in costumes that emphasize their femininity (full skirts, embroideries, bright colors, large hats and flowers), these women proved an inspiration to Maria Grazia Chiuri, the artistic director of the Dior women’s collections," according to the brand.

In the advert, Lawrence describes the meaning behind the collection.

"One of the main inspirations for this collection is the traditional women riders of Mexico. So I'm really excited that this collection is looking at and celebrating these women's heritage through such a modern lens," Lawrence said. "We've been shooting in a beautiful ranch in California with rolling hills, and I can't think of a better landscape to highlight this collection."

"I grew up riding horses, so for me, it reminds of a time before fear. And freedom," she added.

Listen as House muse Jennifer Lawrence and photographer Viviane Sassen discuss the #DiorCruise 2019 campaign. Discover more https://t.co/WViBTc3oyo! pic.twitter.com/oBl3iKNNAk

— Dior (@Dior) October 26, 2018

However, many people are taking issue with the fact that there aren’t any Mexican women in the campaign.

Phoebe Robinson, a comedian and co-host of the "2 Dope Queens" podcast, drew major attention to the campaign earlier this week when she reposted the video of Lawrence along with a pointed take in the caption.

"Lol. Wut?! Sooooooooo, #Dior & #JenniferLawrence wanna celebrate traditional Mexican women riders thru a 'modern lens' ...by having a rich white woman named Jennifer be the face of this campaign?” she wrote alongside a re-post of the campaign video.

“And like they couldn’t think of a better landscape to shoot than in California?! Hmm, I dunno, maybe...like...shoot...in...Mexico...with...a...Mexican...actress like Salma Hayek, Karla Souza, Jessica Alba, Selena Gomez, Eva Longoria, or many others. But I guess they were all unavailable, so you had to go with Jennifer Lawrence," Robinson wrote.

She said that using ‘modern’ to describe the campaign was, "ignorant and gross," and asked her followers to comment with names of Mexican designers she could lend support to.

The post garnered almost 60,000 views and over 1,000 comments.

The collection, which features everything from full skirts and embroidered jackets to corsets and saddlebags, was first revealed during the Cruise 2019 show on May 25, 2018, in France.

For the show, an escaramuza team of eight women on horseback, clad in custom-made Dior dresses, appeared alongside models. It's unclear if any of those on the team were Mexican.

“The reason I like the escaramuzas is because they do something that is so macho -- rodeo -- in our vision, but they decided to do that in their traditional dresses which are so pretty, so feminine,” Chiuri told Women’s Wear Daily in May.

ABC News has reached out to Dior for comment.

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Chesnot/Getty Images(MENLO PARK, Calif.) -- Facebook removed over 1.6 billion fake accounts between April and September of this year, the company disclosed on Thursday.

"We also took down more fake accounts in Q2 and Q3 than in previous quarters, 800 million and 754 million respectively. Most of these fake accounts were the result of commercially motivated spam attacks trying to create fake accounts in bulk," Guy Rosen, vice president of product management wrote in a post on the company's website on Thursday.

"Because we are able to remove most of these accounts within minutes of registration, the prevalence of fake accounts on Facebook remained steady at 3% to 4% of monthly active users as reported in our Q3 earnings," Rosen added.

The company revealed information about its efforts to crack down on fake accounts, hate speech, terrorist propaganda and child pornography ahead of a conference call with reporters that is scheduled for 2 p.m. ET.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Go green or go big?

Or both.

Automakers are flooding the market today with hybrids, plug-in hybrids and electric battery-powered cars, with more models on the horizon.

Even as production of green cars ramp up, automakers are unveiling a dizzying number of vehicles with larger and ever more powerful engines.

A Jeep Grand Cherokee with 707 horsepower. A Lamborghini SUV that can whip laps like its supercar siblings. A Rolls-Royce truck built with a twin-turbo 6.7-liter V-12 engine that averages 14 miles per gallon on city roads and highways. SUVs account for 70 percent of the U.S. market versus 1.5 percent for electric vehicles. Automakers are happy to give customers what they want: sport-utility vehicles have higher margins and generate more revenue.

With more gas guzzlers on the road, can automakers still tout their carbon-cutting credentials?

“In the industry today there is such a disconnect between today and tomorrow,” Jeremy Acevedo, manager of industry analysis for Edmunds, told ABC News. “Automakers have set their sights on the future, which include autonomous and electrified vehicles. But automakers are selling high-profit SUVs in record numbers.”

The average new vehicle transaction price in October was $37,007, according to Kelley Blue Book, which tracks monthly sales. Sales of SUVs and CUVs, which have a higher sticker price than traditional sedans, are helping to push that number to new records.

“The bulk of America speaks with its wallet,” said Acevedo.

Last month an electric vehicle sold for an average of $63,366, according to Kelley Blue Book data. Compare that to the price of a full-size SUV/crossover ($62,833), mid-size car ($25,548) and luxury car ($56,234).

“In order to become a mainstream, practical option, the overall cost and range of an electric car must be on par with a traditional ICE [internal combustion engine] vehicle,” Brandon Mason, an automotive analyst at PwC, told ABC News.

He estimates that will happen by at least 2027.

“Right now they’re not cost competitive,” he explained. “But everyone agrees -- electric cars are the future.”

Ford Motors said it will offer 16 electric vehicles (EVs) and 24 plug-in hybrids and regular hybrids by 2022 -- an investment of $11 billion. The Detroit automaker currently sells five electrified vehicles, including an electric battery-powered Focus. Even its iconic Mustang sports car will go green; a V8-engine hybrid version debuts in 2021. General Motors said it was increasing production of its Bolt electric car by 20 percent to meet global demand. Sales of the Bolt are up more than 15 percent this year, though the majority of sales are outside the U.S.

German automaker Porsche, which started the luxury SUV craze, boasts seven “E-hybrid” vehicles, including six plug-in Panameras and one plug-in Cayenne SUV, which got a full redesign for 2019. Porsche still leads the competition in terms of performance vehicles with environmentally friendly cred. In Europe, for example, 63 percent of Panamera sales have the hybrid powertrain, which allows the vehicle to go short distances on the electric battery. A fully electric Porsche “Taycan” will begin production next year.

Volkswagen, Europe's largest automaker by sales, said on Wednesday it would convert three factories in Germany to build electric cars. The rise of the electric car can be credited to two factors: Tesla and government regulations.

“Even though it’s a smaller player, Tesla casts a large shadow on the industry,” Acevedo explained.

The Model S, Tesla’s $70,000 sedan, was not an instant sales success, he noted. But it “hit its stride” over the years and regularly outsells its gasoline-engine luxury sedan competitors.

“A lot of Tesla’s market promise came from the Model S,” he said.

Ferrari has been quietly testing its gasoline-electric hybrid car. Aston Martin joined the electric car club with its Rapide E sedan. Not to be outdone, Italian sports car maker Maserati recently announced hybrids are in its future even as it rolls out two high-performance versions of its Levante SUV: the GTS with 550 hp and the 590-hp Trofeo.

“The V8 is predominantly focused on the U.S. market,” Matt McAlear, head of product marketing for Maserati North America, told ABC News.

The two V8 models will make up 10 percent of this year’s sales, he said. But by 2022 the Levante can brag that its driving dynamics and performance come without the help of a conventional engine.

“The Levante is still in its infancy,” McAlear said. “It’s being developed as a global vehicle.”

China, the world’s largest car market, also ranks as the No. 1 market for electrified vehicles. Chinese officials have declared their intentions of putting more electrified vehicles on the road, and sales, unsurprisingly, are up.

“There’s a huge national investment and generous rebates for the production of electric cars,” Acevedo said.

Lawmakers in France, India, Norway and Britain are also toying with banning sales of new gasoline and diesel cars. The dichotomy between government and consumer demands are forcing automakers to hedge their bets, Mason pointed out.

“They need to have a global portfolio,” he said.

Particularly confusing for automakers are efforts by the Trump administration to weaken the fuel economy standards established by former President Obama. In August, the Environmental Protection Agency and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration proposed freezing CAFE (Corporate Average Fuel Economy) standards at 37 miles per gallon for new cars and trucks manufactured for sale in the U.S. for model years 2021 through 2026. The Obama administration in 2012 put in place rules that raised CAFE standards for new cars and trucks to 54.5 mpg by 2025. Seventeen states and the District of Columbia have filed lawsuits against the rollback by President Trump.

Regardless of the upcoming legal battles, electric cars and hybrids are not going anywhere. Automakers have also learned that design is just as important as range.

Electric cars are not as “quirky” and “polarizing” in their looks, Acevedo said, adding that some models, like the Jaguar I-PACE SUV and Audi e-tron, are beautifully designed and “more in touch with what shoppers want.” But don’t write off the gas-guzzling SUV just yet.

“There is a willingness” to build these larger and faster vehicles, Mason said. “People are buying them.”

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