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iStock(HOUSTON) -- Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has declared a disaster in 13 counties as Tropical Storm Imelda brought torrential rain and dangerous flash flooding to the Houston area, stranding residents in their homes, drivers in their cars and canceling hundreds of flights at local airports.

Over 900 flights were canceled into and out of Houston area airports due to the severe rain, which reached over 40 inches in some spots.

The storm claimed its first life on Thursday as well. A man in Jefferson County was "electrocuted and drowned" while trying to move his horse, according to the sheriff's office. The family of Hunter Morrison, the man killed, said he was not trying to rescue any people, as had been reported locally, and wanted to correct false reports.

The town of Hamshire, Texas, saw six months' worth of rain in 48 hours. More than 33 inches of rain has fallen in Hamshire since Tuesday -- and over 2 feet of that rainfall within 12 hours.

In the small town of Winnie, Texas, the conditions are "horrible," with rapidly-rising floodwaters making roads impassable, Chambers County Sheriff Brian Hawthorne told ABC News as the rain pounded down Thursday.

"This is the worst flooding I’ve ever seen," Hawthorne said.

Houses flooded during Hurricane Harvey two years ago are now taking in water again; some homes have 4 to 5 feet of water inside, said Hawthorne.

Anna Avales' home in Winnie is still recovering from flooding during Harvey. She called Thursday's rain "devastating" and is "hoping and praying that it stops."

James Gibson and his wife walked ABC News through their Chambers County home, where the wood floors are now submerged under roughly 8 inches of water.

The rain fell “too fast to do anything” he said.

"Until it quits raining, it's gonna be a nightmare," the sheriff said.

Over 300 people were rescued from homes in Chambers County as the water rose, local officials said.

Dump trucks and airboats were being used to get residents to safety.

The threat isn't over.

The relentless, heavy rain is continuing to slam parts of southeastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana Thursday afternoon. It'll taper off Thursday evening leaving lingering, scattered showers.

But thunderstorms and downpours are possible again on Friday.

Up to 4 inches of rain could still fall in the hard-hit areas from Houston to Beaumont from Thursday afternoon to Friday afternoon.

The remains of Tropical Storm Imelda with then track inland and bring areas of heavy rain -- up to 4 inches -- to east Texas and northwestern Louisiana.

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iStock(EL PASO, Texas) -- The El Paso shooting victim whose story of heroism was disputed by police said he's standing by his recounting of the attack at the Walmart.

Chris Grant was supposed to be one of 11 people honored by the White House for bravery in early September before he was detained by Secret Service over an open arrest warrant.

El Paso police later said video from the shooting did not match Grant's claims of throwing bottles to distract the gunman.

"[His actions] were basically human instincts, survival instincts, but they were not heroic or as he described," police spokesman Enrique Carillo previously told ABC News, declining to answer specific questions.

Grant now wants to tell his version of the events.

His lawyer said on Wednesday that Grant "stands by his statements and his recollections he made to police, to Chris Cuomo and others following the shooting.”

"He is still recovering from his physical injuries, but his recollection of the events on August 3, 2019 are genuine,” his lawyer, Rosana Narvaez, read from a statement.

Grant, a 50-year-old Texas resident, sustained bullet wounds during the shooting and underwent multiple surgeries.

He was released from the hospital by the time of the White House event Sept. 9 and was praised by President Donald Trump, but he didn't attend.

"Chris grabbed -- listen to this -- soda bottles, and anything else in front of him, and began hurling them at the gunman, distracting him from the other shoppers and causing the shooter to turn towards Chris and fire at him,” Trump said in his speech. "Chris suffered two very serious gunshot wounds, but he is recovering well and we wish him the best.”

Grant's mother, who was in attendance, collected the certificate of commendation on her son's behalf. Grant was later released from custody and it's unclear where the case stands.

El Paso police said the video footage they reviewed contradicted Grant's story, but they declined to describe what action, if any, Grant took, or comment on any interaction he might have had with the gunman.

Narvaez said that Grant, nor anyone outside of law enforcement, has reviewed the surveillance video in question.

"Nonetheless, a video cannot begin to capture the entire story of Mr. Grant's and others' plights as the mass shooter rampaged inside Walmart,” she added.

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iStock(MORRISTOWN, N.J.) -- A New Jersey man was indicted Thursday on charges he supported Hezbollah by scouting possible targets for an attack.

Alexei Saab began training with Hezbollah operatives overseas and surveilled multiple locations in the U.S., the FBI said.

According to the indictment, Saab joined Hezbollah in 1996 in Lebanon where he observed and reported on the movements of Israeli troops. He trained to handle and fire an AK-47, an M16 and other weapons. He also was trained to construct explosive devices, with the federal records showing diagrams of bombs he had built.

Saab entered the U.S. in 2000 and applied for citizenship in 2005. He became a naturalized citizen three years later.

Federal prosecutors said he continued to receive training in Lebanon and surveilled "dozens" of locations in New York City, including the New York Stock Exchange, U.N. building, Statue of Liberty, Rockefeller Center and local airports, tunnels and bridges.

"In particular, SAAB focused on the structural weaknesses of locations he surveilled in order to determine how a future attack could cause the most destruction. SAAB’s reporting to the IJO (Islamic Jihad Organization) included the materials used to construct a particular target, how close in proximity one could get to a target, and site weaknesses or 'soft spots' that the IJO could exploit if it attacked a target in the future," court records said.

Saab also conducted similar scouting operations in Washington, D.C., and Boston, among other cities. Those targets included Fenway Park and the Prudential Center in Boston and the U.S. Capitol and Lincoln Memorial in Washington.

Saab, 42, of Morristown, New Jersey, is charged with providing material support to a terror organization, receipt of military-type training from a designated foreign terrorist organization, unlawful procurement or naturalization to facilitate an act of international terrorism, among other offenses.

The unlawful naturalization charge stems from a phony marriage, with federal authorities saying Saab testified the marriage "was not for the purpose of procuring an immigration benefit."

The complaint also outlines Saab's attempts to murder an Israeli spy in Lebanon in 2003 and 2005. He even approached the man's vehicle and attempted to shoot into the driver's seat, but the gun did not fire.

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iStock(COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.) -- A Colorado mother is facing criticism from wildlife officials who said she put an injured bobcat into her car next to her child.

Parks and Wildlife officials in the southeast region of the state issued a warning to the public on Twitter after describing a "lucky" Colorado Springs woman who put the injured predator in her car and escaped unscathed.

The officials stressed to "NEVER PICK UP WILD ANIMALS" and asked anyone who comes in contact with them to contact their department.

The bobcat was mortally wounded, officials said, and was too injured to react to being picked up and placed in the car.

"No one should ever try this. This could have been tragic," parks officials said.

Parks officials throughout the state agreed with that assessment, with the main Colorado Parks and Wildlife Twitter page retweeting the information with one word: "speechless."

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iStock(NEW YORK) -- The bird population in the U.S. and Canada has declined more than 29% percent -- or by nearly 3 billion birds -- in the last 50 years, according to a new study.

The stark losses signals a "widespread ecological crisis," as the bird population is an indicator of environmental health, according to the study, published Thursday in the journal Science.

The decline has affected a diverse group of birds and habitats, including songbirds such as meadowlarks, long-distance migrants such as swallows and backyard birds such as sparrows. Grassland birds were hit especially hard, with a 53% reduction in population -- or more than 720 million birds -- while shorebirds that frequent sensitive coastlines have lost more than one third of their population.

In addition, the volume of birds that participate in spring migration has dropped by 14% in just the last 10 years.

While researchers expected to see a continuing decline in the population, the results of the study showed "pervasive losses among common birds across all habitats," Ken Rosenberg, senior scientist at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and American Bird Conservancy and lead author of the study, said in a statement.

Scientists believe that the habitats in the two countries have been so severely impacted by human activity, such as urbanization and agricultural intensification, that they no longer support robust wildlife populations, which is likely the largest factor driving the declines, the study notes.

While the researchers did not analyze the exact cause of the declines, other studies have pointed to free-roaming domestic cats, collisions with glass, buildings and other structures and the pervasive use of pesticides associated with widespread declines in insects, an essential food source for birds, as potential reasons for mortality rates in birds, the paper stated.

In addition, climate change is expected to exacerbate the problem, according to the study, but more research is needed to pinpoint the primary causes for declines in individual species.

The findings were determined by multiple, independent lines of evidence, Rosenburg said. This included data from weather radar stations across North America spanning more than 10 years as well data collected from the ground over the last 50 years, according to the study.

The data published in the study is "consistent" with what scientists are seeing elsewhere with bird populations elsewhere in the world as well as other living species that have experienced massive declines, such as insects and amphibians, Peter Marra, director of the Georgetown Environment Initiative at Georgetown University and co-author of the study, said in a statement.

"It's imperative to address immediate and ongoing threats, both because the domino effects can lead to the decay of ecosystems that humans depend on for our own health and livelihoods -- and because people all over the world cherish birds in their own right," Marra said.

In order to mitigate the losses, Michael Parr, president of American Bird Conservancy, suggested policy changes such as strengthening the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, working to ban harmful pesticides and to properly fund bird conservation programs.

On an individual level, people can practice making windows safer for birds, keeping cats indoors and doing their part to protect habitats, Parr said.

Some species have rebounded as a result of human efforts -- such as waterfowl, including ducks, geese and swans, whose populations have increased over the past 50 years due to investments by conservation by hunters and billions of dollars of government funding for wetland protection and restoration.

In addition, raptors, such as the bald eagle, have made a comeback since 1970 after the pesticide DDT was banned and legislation to protect it was passed in the U.S. and Canada.

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iStock(CHICAGO) -- Felony murder charges have been dropped against five Chicago teenagers after a 14-year-old who was with them during a burglary attempt was shot and killed by a homeowner, prosecutors announced.

The teens were initially charged with murder after the youngest member of their group died after they allegedly tried to break into a car in front of a home in Old Mill Creek, Illinois, about 47 miles north of Chicago, on Aug. 13, according to the Lake County Sheriff's Office.

When the 75-year-old homeowner went outside to confront the teens, he told deputies that two of the people in the group "quickly approached him," one of whom was "holding something in his hand," prompting him to fire his gun at least three times.

A 14-year-old boy was struck by gunfire and was pronounced dead after the group fled the scene and dropped him off near a Gurnee Police officer who was tending to an unrelated traffic stop about three miles away.

Lake County State’s Attorney Michael Nerheim said in a statement on Thursday that his office decided to drop the murder charges after reviewing the evidence, consulting with the teens' defense attorneys and considering the wishes of the victim's family.

However, each of the offenders "will be held responsible and face appropriate sentences," Nerheim said.

The sole 18-year-old in the group, Diamond Davis, will be formally charged with felony conspiracy to commit burglary and misdemeanor criminal trespass to a motor vehicle. She is expected to waive her preliminary hearing during her bond hearing on Thursday afternoon and plead guilty to the charges next week, Nerheim said.

A public defender for Davis declined to provide a comment to ABC News on the case.

The four other offenders, who are all 16 and 17 years old, will be tried in juvenile court, but Nerheim could not provide the details of their charges "due to strict laws governing juvenile courtroom proceedings."

The homeowner was in bed around 1:15 a.m. when he saw headlights moving up his "exceptionally long driveway," which sits on a remote property, Nerheim said. He told authorities that as he was getting ready to go outside, he noticed the SUV turn around to face the street before several people inside got out and approached his home.

The man then armed himself with his gun, which he owned legally, and fired it out of fear for his and his wife's safety, striking the 14-year-old, Nerheim said.

After the teens fled the scene, they led authorities on a high-speed chase back to Chicago and only stopped the car once they ran out of gas, Nerheim said.

They then fled on foot but were later caught, telling detectives that they didn't stop the vehicle because "they didn't want to go back to jail," Nerheim said.

A 10-inch long hunting knife and a cell phone with pinned GPS coordinates of other homes near Old Mill Creek were later found on the homeowner's driveway, Nerheim said.

The "sole purpose" of the teens' trip from Chicago to Old Mill Creek "was to commit several vehicle burglaries," Nerheim said.

"The dilemma I have faced for the last five weeks surrounding the Old Mill Creek case has been balancing justice, the safety of our community, and recognizing the ages of the offenders involved," Nerheim said.

Although Nerheim initially charged the teens with felony murder, which "does fit the crime committed," he decided to exercise "discretion in this situation," as he hopes the teens "will learn from this tragedy," and "take this opportunity to be rehabilitated," due to their young ages, he said.

"It is time for these offenders to understand the seriousness of their actions and face the consequences," Nerheim said in the statement. "If they choose to continue to follow the troubled path they are currently on, it will end in only one of two ways -- either with another tragic funeral or with more involvement with the criminal justice system."

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iStock(PHILADELPHIA) -- A Philadelphia man is in custody after allegedly confessing to the murder of a woman who has been missing for 16 years, prosecutors said.

The arrest of Jade Babcock, 49, came after a tip in the 2003 missing person’s case of Brenda Jacobs, according to the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office.

The tip -- which Lycoming County District Attorney Kenneth Osokow said came Monday -- led to the discovery this week of human remains in a storage facility in Northeast Philadelphia.

The remains are suspected to be of Jacobs, who was believed to be in a relationship with Babcok, said Osokow.

Jacobs, who was about 39 when she went missing, lived in Lycoming County in central Pennsylvania, about 180 miles away from Philadelphia. She had been missing since 2003 but was not reported missing by family until 2013, prosecutors said. Osokow would not comment on why it took so long for the missing person’s case to be filed.

Babcock was interviewed in 2013 or 2014 when Jacobs was reported missing, Osokow said, and has now allegedly confessed to Jacobs' murder, though Osokow would not elaborate.

"When there is no swift resolution to an investigation, perpetrators do begin to believe that they can get away with murder," Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner said in a statement. "With the help of our State Police, that won't be true for Jade Babcock. May those who have been missing and mourning Brenda Jacobs for years know some peace in the very near future."

Babcock was arrested on Tuesday and charged with abuse of a corpse, obstruction of justice and tampering with evidence.

Philadelphia prosecutors said homicide charges are expected. Osokow said homicide charge determinations "will be made shortly."

Osokow would not comment on a motive and said prosecutors have not yet been informed of Jacobs' cause and manner of death.

Babcock, who is being held without bail, has not yet entered a plea. He is set to return to court for a status hearing on Oct. 18. It was not immediately clear if he had an attorney.

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Bridgeton Police Department(BRIDGETON, N.J.) -- An Amber Alert remains in effect in New Jersey for 5-year-old Dulce Maria Alavez amid a statewide manhunt for an unidentified individual who police say was seen leading the little girl into a red van.

Dulce was last seen Monday afternoon in the area of City Park in Bridgeton, N.J.

Dulce's mother reported to authorities that she saw her daughter playing on the swings with her 3-year-old brother, about 30 yards away, while she remained in her car with an 8-year-old relative. The mother said the toddler returned to her car without his sister and she was unable to find her, according to a press release from the Bridgetown Police Department.

Local, state and federal authorities have been searching for the little girl ever since. FBI Newark on Thursday urged the public to "not spread rumors on social media" with respect to the investigation or Dulce's disappearance.

"Information is being released through official channels. Don't be responsible for distracting the focus of everyone's efforts," the FBI tweeted. A spokeswoman for the agency said the tweet was not in response to any specific rumors, but a general reminder.

Dulce's mother, Noema Alavez Perez, said her daughter "would never run off" or "walk by herself."

"All of us are missing her a lot," Perez told reporters Wednesday.

The New Jersey State Police issued the Amber Alert for Dulce early Wednesday after investigators interviewed people who were in the area at the time she vanished. Based on those interviews, detectives believe Dulce was taken by a light-skinned, possibly Hispanic man wearing a black shirt and red pants with orange sneakers.

The unidentified man is described as being around 5-foot-6 to 5-foot-8 and having a thin build, acne and no facial hair. He was last seen leading Dulce from the Bridgeton City Park playground into a red van with tinted windows and a sliding door on Monday at approximately 4:20 p.m. local time, according to the New Jersey State Police.

"It could be anybody. We don't know if it's a family member, strangers," Dulce's aunt, Nayiber Alavez, told reporters Wednesday. "But the only thing we're asking is for her to come back home safely."

Bridgeton Police Chief Michael Gaimari said investigators haven't ruled anything out and that the individual responsible for Dulce's disappearance could be a stranger or a known person. Detectives have been in constant contact with the little girl's mother and will conduct follow-up interviews with more family members.

"We don't have any solid suspects, we are investigating all the possibilities," Gaimari told reporters Wednesday. "We have video surveillance that we've gathered from all of this area as much as we could obtain."

Surveillance footage shows Dulce with her mother and little brother buying ice cream at a nearby store before they headed to the park on Monday afternoon. She's seen wearing a yellow shirt, black-and-white checkered pants with a flower design, and white sandals. Her long dark hair was pulled back in a pony tail at the time.

Dulce is Hispanic and roughly 3 feet, 5 inches tall, police said.

Anyone with information on her whereabouts is urged to call the New Jersey State Police Missing Persons Unit at 1-609-882-2000 ext. 2554, the Bridgeton Police Department at 1-856-451-0033, or to immediately dial 911.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Dangerous flash flooding is wreaking havoc in Texas with the remnants of Tropical Storm Imelda dumping massive amounts of rain overnight and into the morning.

The torrential rain prompted a full ground stop at Houston's George Bush Intercontinental Airport on Thursday morning. The airport later reopened but officials warned of flooded roadways and delayed flights.

More than 33 inches of rain has fallen in the town of Hamshire, Texas, since Tuesday -- and over 25 inches of that rainfall was overnight.

In the small town of Winnie, Texas, the conditions are "horrible," with rapidly rising floodwaters making roads impassable, Chambers County Sheriff Brian Hawthorne told ABC News as the rain pounded down Thursday.

"This is the worst flooding I’ve ever seen," Hawthorne said.

Some of the same houses flooded during Hurricane Harvey two years ago are now taking on water again, said Hawthorne.

The water has "run out of places to go," the sheriff said.

Some homes have four to five feet of water inside, Hawthorne said, and dump trucks and airboats were being used to get people to safety. The sheriff believed about 45 people still needed to be rescued as of Thursday morning.

The local hospital stayed open but about one dozen patients were evacuated, he added.

"Until it quits raining, it's gonna be a nightmare," the sheriff said.

In Beaumont -- between Houston and Lake Charles, La. -- over 250 high-water rescue requests were called into 911, the local police department said Thursday morning.

"Please shelter in place and seek high ground," the Beaumont police tweeted. "DO NOT drive."

Rainfall rates up to 5 inches per hour were reported overnight near Beaumont, Texas, dumping the worst flooding since Hurricane Harvey.

The threat isn't over. What's left of Tropical Storm Imelda is still sitting over eastern Texas and western Louisiana, bringing more rain Thursday morning.

The remains of Imelda will then slowly track north on Thursday spreading rain into northeastern Texas, northern Louisiana and southern Arkansas and Oklahoma.

As much as 10 inches of additional rain is expected in eastern Texas and more flash flooding is expected in the next 24 hours.

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bernie_photo/iStock(LONDON) -- A petition that now has nearly 30,000 signatures and counting on Change.org was started by a simple online search.

Maria Beatrice Giovanardi, a London-based communications and marketing expert, typed the word “woman” into a search engine earlier this summer while looking up information on women’s earnings.

She said she was bombarded with results for synonymous of woman that included words like bitch, piece, bit, mare, baggage, wench, petticoat, frail and biddy.

“I was like, 'What’s going on? Why are these the synonyms?'” Giovanardi, 28, told Good Morning America. “I don’t see myself like this as a woman.

“My girlfriends don’t speak like this so it’s a man’s point of view,” she recalled thinking.

Giovanardi learned the information about the word "woman" she saw online came from content produced by Oxford University Press, a department of the University of Oxford in the U.K. that also produces the Oxford English Dictionary (OED).

As Giovanardi looked further into it, she saw more examples of what she described as sexist language, including using sentences like these as examples alongside the definition of women: "‘One of his sophisticated London women;" "Don't be daft, woman!": and "he wondered whether Billy had his woman with him."

"If you look up 'man' you see sentences of what men can be doing as individuals, while with women you see sentences of women as an oppressed group, not as individuals," she said. "Their goal is to portray language but this has a very judgmental bias."

Giovanardi took action by starting the Change.org petition titled, "Change Oxford Dictionary’s Sexist Definition of ‘Woman.'"

Since June, the petition has drawn 29,926 signatures and counting.

"One of our goals was to have as many signatures as the Oxford student body, which is around 24,000 students, so we achieved that goal," she said. "But the more pressure the better so we hope to get more and more."

The petition has already caught the attention of the Oxford University Press, which dedicated a blog post to responding to the petition.

The post specifies that the content around women called out by the petition comes from the Oxford Thesaurus of English and the Oxford Dictionary of English, which "aim to cover contemporary English usage and are accessible online in a variety of formats."

"These texts are based on the methodologies of descriptive, corpus-based lexicography, meaning that editors analyse large quantities of evidence from real-life use to determine the meanings of words," the post explains in part. "If there is evidence of an offensive or derogatory word or meaning being widely used in English, it will not be excluded from the dictionary solely on the grounds that it is offensive or derogatory."

Oxford University Press also told GMA in a statement Thursday: "Our dictionaries strive to reflect, rather than dictate, how language is used. This is achieved by using an evidence-based approach, drawing on vast collections of written English from books, magazines, journals, and other digital sources."

"Our editors analyse these collections to determine how real people use English in their daily lives," the statement read. "In cases where words or senses are considered offensive, they are clearly labelled as such."

Giovanardi's petition definitely started a conversation, which is what she told GMA was one of her goals.

One woman, who identifies herself as a feminist and a linguist, took to Twitter to explain why she didn't sign the petition.

"Lobbying dictionaries to make their definitions fit your political preferences is misguided," she wrote.

 

Dictionary wars: a thread. For everyone who’s been in my mentions all day complaining about a petition that suggested the Oxford Dictionary entry for ‘woman’ might include an example containing ‘trans woman’. /1

— Debbie Cameron (@wordspinster) September 18, 2019

 

Giovanardi said she plans to keep up the "pressure" with her petition because, for her, Oxford University's reply was not enough.

"Our point is that sexism against someone is not acceptable and it is not okay to have definitions like these about women," she said. "We also want them to remove the sentences that denote women being the property of men, and there’s a lot of them,and make it more inclusive."

And even people who may not sign the petition should walk away from the debate asking themselves questions, according to Giovanardi.

"I hope people ask themselves if are we doing enough to patrol sexism and see how widespread it is and ask if we are we taking it seriously enough," she said. "Because it’s very embedded in every part of society."

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albertc111/iStock(GILROY, Calif.) -- The deadly shooting at a California garlic festival is not going to stop the tradition from continuing next year.

The organizer of the Gilroy Garlic Festival announced that they are planning to hold the festival again in 2020 in spite of the July 2019 shooting that left three dead and more than a dozen injured.

"There's still a process of healing and grieving and that's going to go on a long time, and it's different for everyone. But the outpouring of support and feedback from people who want to be here next year, want us to be here next year is undeniable and we want to honor that," festival executive director Brian Bowe told ABC affiliate KSBW on Tuesday.

The festival's website also reiterated their mission to bring the 42nd year of the event back to the community next year.

"The Gilroy Garlic Festival has always brought our local community together and we are united in honoring those whose lives were lost and forever changed by the tragedy on July 28, 2019," the statement on the website reads.

"We are deeply grateful for the ongoing support of our volunteers, vendors, and visitors as we look forward to Gilroy Garlic Festival 42 in July 2020. With your help, we can continue our mission of providing vital funding support for over 140 local charities and non-profit organizations -- while celebrating all that is good in our community," the statement continued.

The three people who were killed in the July shooting were identified as Trevor Irby, 25, Keyla Salazar, 13, and Stephen Romero, 6.

The alleged gunman was fatally shot by officers who arrived on scene.

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MicroStockHub/iStock(COLUMBIA, Mo.) -- The mother of a Missouri woman who has been missing for more than a decade says she's sure that human remains found by police in a landfill Wednesday are that of her daughter.

Authorities announced Wednesday that they had found remains that were consistent with those of Megan Shultz, who disappeared from her Columbia, Missouri, home in 2006.

Columbia Police Chief Geoff Jones, whose department has been pursuing the case for 13 years, said at a news conference Wednesday that "the remains and evidence located with the remains are consistent with what we expected to find when looking for Megan."

Jones said that DNA testing to prove a match would take some time -- but Shultz' mother Debra told Missouri TV station KOMU-TV 8 that she's confident the remains are her daughter's.

"She was dressed exactly the way that I described her and I understand that the body is somewhat intact," Debra Shultz said.

Megan Shultz's disappearance confounded investigators for more than a decade after her husband, Keith Comfort, told authorities that the 24-year-old walked out of their apartment after an argument at around 1 a.m. on Aug. 5, 2006, and never returned.

Police did not consider Comfort a suspect in her disappearance, and he subsequently moved to Wisconsin to raise the couple's young daughter.

In the ensuing 13 years, police followed tips from people who said they had spotted Shultz as far east as Kansas City, but none of them panned out.

The break in the case came last month when, police say, 13 years to the day after reporting Shultz missing, Comfort, now 37, walked into the police station in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, and confessed to killing his wife.

According to court documents, Comfort said that he and Shultz had argued, and that he had forced her to the ground and strangled her. After he realized she wasn’t breathing, he put her body in a garbage bag and "threw her into the ... dumpster" of their apartment complex, according to KOMU 8.

Armed with that knowledge, Columbia police began a painstaking search of the city landfill to try to recover Shultz' remains. The dig covered a 14-acre area as officers worked to identify items that were disposed of around the time Shultz went missing, according to Columbia ABC affiliate KMIZ-TV.

"We talked the first day of the landfill, and most of us have children," Chief Jones said at Wednesday's press conference. "And none of us, including the city manager, were comfortable with that being the resting place of a child. Somebody's child was there."

On Wednesday, police informed Debra Shultz of their discovery.

"I'm still in shock. It's like 'Oh my God, my baby will get to come home," Shultz said.

Comfort is being held in custody on a $1 million bond, according to KMIZ.

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WABC-TV(NEW YORK) -- A fight over a girl involving at least 50 teenagers left a 16-year-old dead after he allegedly was stabbed in the chest by an 18-year-old as many teens, rather than help the stabbing victim, filmed his demise.

The fight broke out at around 3:45 p.m. Monday afternoon outside of a bagel shop in Oceanside, New York, close to where the victim, Khaseen Morris, went to high school.

An anonymous witness to the fight who spoke to New York ABC station WABC-TV said Morris was ambushed by the group.

"There was a bunch of people sitting by the Chinese restaurant ... about 15 kids, and then, all of a sudden, while I was on the phone speaking, eight -- seven or eight kids came from the north and targeted certain people that I believe they were looking for," the witness said.

Tyler Flach, 18, of Lido Beach, was arrested late Wednesday and charged with murder, according to WABC. He pleaded not guilty at an arraignment on Thursday afternoon and was ordered held without bail.

Morris was stabbed in the chest in and later died in hospital. Police said they believe he was targeted.

"There's got to be about 50, 60, 70 kids here," Detective Lt. Stephen Fitzpatrick, commander of the Nassau County Police Homicide Division, told members of the media at a press conference on Tuesday morning. "We have a handful of kids that have come forward who have identified people involved in this."

"I don't think anybody here is naive to who is involved in this incident. I think all the players are known to each other," said Det. Lt. Fitzpatrick.

Perhaps the most shocking aspect of Morris' death is the fact that people filmed him dying rather than trying to help him.

"He was a person that would help anyone, and no one helped him," Keyanna Morris, Khaseen's sister, told WABC-TV. "He told my mom this is the first time in so long that he's been so happy because he finally found a school where he could be himself with nobody judging him.”

Meanwhile, Phyllis Harrington, the superintendent overseeing Oceanside High School, issued a video statement condemning the "senseless act of violence", imploring parents to monitor their children's social media activity, and saying that the community would get through this tragedy together.

"The kindness and generosity that you model for your children are what makes our community special," Harrington said. "It's those very values that will bind us together and get us through and keep us strong because we are anchored together by purpose, passion and people."

Students at Oceanside High School have been grieving since throughout the week.

"Students are crying in the hallway," said Victoria Lizama, a student at the high school. She said many had been quiet this week, not talking to each other.

Fitzpatrick said police still were looking for additional witnesses to come forward.

Said Fitzpatrick: "Kids stood here and didn't help Khaseen -- they'd rather video this event. ... They videoed his death instead of helping. So anyone who has video, come forward. Do the right thing for Khaseen."

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kali9/iStock(SHANDON, Calif.) -- At least one person was killed and seven others injured when a tour bus crashed off a California roadway late Wednesday night, authorities said.

The deadly crash occurred not long after the bus departed from a concert venue in the city of Paso Robles, where country and gospel singer Josh Turner performed Wednesday night. The eight people on board the ill-fated bus were part of Turner's road crew, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire), which sent crews to the scene.

Turner and his band were traveling on different buses and were not injured in the incident, Cal Fire said.

The bus veered hundreds of feet off the highway and down a deep embankment near the small town of Shandon, according to the San Luis Obipso Sheriff's Department.

It's unclear where the bus was headed or how it crashed.

In addition to the one fatality, five people sustained "moderate" injuries" while two others suffered "major" injuries, Cal Fire said.

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New Jersey State Police(BRIDGETON, N.J.) -- An Amber Alert remains in effect in New Jersey for 5-year-old Dulce Maria Alavez amid a statewide manhunt for an unidentified individual who police say was seen leading the little girl into a red van.

Ducle was last seen Monday afternoon in the area of City Park in Bridgeton, New Jersey.

Dulce's mother reported to authorities that she saw her daughter playing on the swings with her 3-year-old brother, about 30 yards away, while she remained in her car with an 8-year-old relative. The mother said the toddler returned to her car without his sister and she was unable to find her, according to a press release from the Bridgetown Police Department.

Local, state and federal authorities have been searching for the little girl ever since.

Dulce's mother, Noema Alavez Perez, said her daughter "would never run off" or "walk by herself."

"All of us are missing her a lot," Perez told reporters Wednesday.

The New Jersey State Police issued the Amber Alert for Dulce early Wednesday after investigators interviewed people who were in the area at the time she vanished. Based on those interviews, detectives believe Dulce was taken by a light-skinned, possibly Hispanic man wearing a black shirt and red pants with orange sneakers.

The unidentified man is described as being around 5-foot-6 to 5-foot-8 and having a thin build, acne and no facial hair. He was last seen leading Dulce from the Bridgeton City Park playground into a red van with tinted windows and a sliding door on Monday at approximately 4:20 p.m. local time, according to the New Jersey State Police.

"It could be anybody. We don't know if it's a family member, strangers," Dulce's aunt, Nayiber Alavez, told reporters Wednesday. "But the only thing we're asking is for her to come back home safely."

Bridgeton Police Chief Michael Gaimari said investigators haven't ruled anything out and that the individual responsible for Ducle's disappearance could be a stranger or a known person. Detectives have been in constant contact with the little girl's mother and will conduct follow-up interviews with more family members.

"We don't have any solid suspects, we are investigating all the possibilities," Gaimari told reporters Wednesday. "We have video surveillance that we've gathered from all of this area as much as we could obtain."

Surveillance footage shows Dulce with her mother and little brother buying ice cream at a nearby store before they headed to the park on Monday afternoon. She's seen wearing a yellow shirt, black-and-white checkered pants with a flower design, and white sandals. Her long dark hair was pulled back in a pony tail at the time.

Dulce is Hispanic and roughly 3 feet, 5 inches tall, police said.

Anyone with information on her whereabouts is urged to call the New Jersey State Police Missing Persons Unit at 1-609-882-2000 ext. 2554, the Bridgeton Police Department at 1-856-451-0033, or to immediately dial 911.

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