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Local News

Long-time Barry Central Dispatch employee honored for dedication, service

A resolution recognizing and honoring the late Suzanne Rose, an employee at Barry Central Dispatch 911, for her commitment, dedication and service to Central Dispatch and the safety of Barry County was unanimously adopted by the Barry County Commission Tuesday.

 

Central Dispatch Director Stephanie Lehman said Sue Rose was a crucial part of Central Dispatch as the first person hired by the director at the new facility. A Dispatch employee for more than 25 years, she recently passed away after a difficult health battle.

“We would like honor her service to Barry County with this resolution,” she said.

 

As administrative assistant from Nov. 9, 1992 until her retirement April 30, 2018, Sue earned certifications in many areas, including EMD, LEIN, CPT and Dispatcher Telecommunicator Manager Training, which allowed her to assist telecommunicators when needed. She also served on the Central Dispatch Administrative Board and Technical Advisory Committee, the resolution read.

 

Sue created and implemented many procedures that are still used for the administrative office, including a filing structure for vendor records, built database documents to track accounts payable and established a system to retain employee files.

 

Her keen attention to detail and superior accounting skills helped her track and balance the yearly budget, keep payments timely, process expansive State of Michigan expense and training reports and ensure that payroll for her team was accurate, the resolution continued.

 

A beloved member of the public service community, in her long career Sue crossed paths with hundreds of professionals in police, fire, EMS fields and 911 associations. Suzanne was described by them kind, compassionate, devoted, dignified and professional.

 

In other business, commissioners recommended the clock in the Barry County Courthouse clock tower be repaired and modernized at a cost of $21,000 to be paid from the Building Rehabilitation Fund.

 

Building and Grounds Director Tim Neeb recommended the repair. The clock has four independent motors and faces, one is four minutes ahead of the other, and all are at the end of their 20-year lives. Replacing the four would cost $7,000 each, he said.

 

Neeb recommended the four motors be removed and replaced with one central motor for all faces, making more accurate time and resetting easier than it is with four.

Because of the clock face angles, it is hard to reset the clock, something they have to do by hand because the clocks don’t recognize time changes.

 

The new controller is computerized making changes easier. New hands are also needed, there will be three or four models to choose from, he said.

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