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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(NEW YORK ) -- Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-MA, compared President Donald Trump's presidency to "dog years" in an interview with "The Late Show" on Monday.

The comment came after "The Late Show" host Stephen Colbert pointed out that she hadn’t been on the show since the start of Trump’s presidency.

“Oh, I remember those days,” Warren said with a smile. “How long has he been president now?”

“Forty-five years ... If my bone density is any indication,” Colbert replied.

“That's right. They were dog years, now they're Trump years. It's going to be hard,” Warren joked.”

Warren also hit back at Trump for referring to her as “Pocahontas” in a tweet earlier this month.

“Donald Trump thinks if he's going to start every one of these tweets to me with some kind of racist slur here that he's going to shut me up,” the senator said. “It didn't work in the past, it's not going to work in the future.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The tax plan advanced by House Republicans last week will spur economic growth, but still add more than $1 trillion to the deficit, according to a new study released Monday.

The macroeconomic analysis from the Tax Policy Center, a joint venture of the Brookings Institution and the Urban Institute, finds that the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act would boost economic output by .6 percent of gross domestic product in 2018, and .3 percent in a decade.

The economic growth would provide $169 billion in additional tax revenue for the federal government over the next decade, according to the analysis. The entire tax package is expected to add $1.4 trillion to the deficit over the same period of time.

The White House and congressional Republicans, who have criticized the Tax Policy Center’s findings in the past, have said passing the plan will spur economic growth that will offset the tax cuts in the package.

The TPC had to revise its initial analysis of the House plan over a computing error.

The House plan will not make it to President Donald Trump’s desk unchanged: Senate Republicans will vote next week on their own version of the tax bill, which will then be reconciled with the House-passed proposal.

While Senate Republicans and the White House also support repealing Obamacare’s individual health insurance mandate as part of the plan, White House budget director Mick Mulvaney said Sunday that Trump could also forego the mandate repeal to help the proposal clear the House and Senate.

“If a good tax bill can pass with that Obamacare mandate repeal as part of it, great. If it needs to come out in order for that good tax bill to pass, we can live with that as well,” Mulvaney said in an interview with CBS News’ "Face the Nation."

In a separate study released Monday, the Tax Policy Center found that the Senate proposal would reduce taxes on average for all income groups in 2019 and 2025.

Roughly 10 percent of taxpayers would pay higher taxes compared to current law under the proposal in 2019, a number that would rise to 50 percent in 2027, according to the analysis.

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ABCNews.com(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump's namesake charitable foundation is being shut down, in keeping with previously announced plans.

In a filing with the IRS last week, the foundation said it intends to dissolve and is seeking approval to distribute its remaining funds. The documents were posted publicly on Guidestar.org and reviewed by ABC News.

"The foundation continues to cooperate with the New York attorney general's charities division, and as previously announced by the president, his advisers are working with the charities division to wind up the affairs of the foundation. The foundation looks forward to distributing its remaining assets at the earliest possible time to aid numerous worthy charitable organizations," a spokesperson for the Trump Foundation told ABC News.

In December, when Trump was president-elect, he announced plans to shutter the Trump Foundation "to avoid even the appearance of any conflict with my role as president."

"I have decided to continue to pursue my strong interest in philanthropy in other ways," he added.

The organization had come under scrutiny for its practices.

Last year the Trump Foundation conceded that it gave "income or assets" to a "disqualified person" — a prohibited practice known as self-dealing — according to a 2015 tax filing obtained by ABC News. It was not clear from the filing how much was given or to whom.

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman launched the investigation into the Trump Foundation in 2016 over a donation that was made to a political fundraising group associated with Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi. He ordered that the foundation stop fundraising late last year.

In a statement Monday evening, the New York Attorney General's Office said: "Our investigation into the Donald J. Trump Foundation remains ongoing. Its fundraising activities remain suspended following the AG’s notice of violation last year. As the foundation is still under investigation by this office, it cannot legally dissolve until that investigation is complete.”

At the end of 2016, the Trump Foundation had a little more than $970,000 in assets, according to last week's filing.

Even though his name is the basis for the charity, Trump was never the biggest contributor, according to the organization's 990 forms for 2001 through 2014.

Trump made contributions to the foundation from 2001 to 2008, but he is not listed as making any financial contributions since then. His contributions ranged from $713,000 in 2004 to $30,000 in 2008; his total contributions to his foundation are in excess of $2.7 million.

Earlier this year, the New York Attorney General's Office also launched an investigation into the Eric Trump Foundation after questions were raised about the charity in light of a media report that it paid large sums to use Trump-owned properties for fundraisers.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Travels by Trump campaign adviser Carter Page to meet with senior officials in Hungary during the 2016 presidential election are being closely examined by congressional investigators, given the increasingly close ties between Hungary and Russia and the role of the country as a hub for Russian intelligence activity. The Hungarian prime minister was the first foreign leader to endorse Donald Trump’s candidacy.

Though characterized as a low-level volunteer, Page held high-level foreign policy meetings with Hungarian officials before the 2016 presidential election, ABC News has learned.

The meetings included a 45-minute session in September 2016 with Jeno Megyesy, who is a close adviser to the Hungarian prime minister and focuses on relations with the United States, at his office in Budapest, where Page presented himself as a member of then-candidate Donald Trump’s foreign policy team.

Megyesy confirmed to ABC News in an interview Friday that he met with Page at the request of Reka Szemerkenyi, the Hungarian ambassador to the U.S. Megyesy said he did most of the talking at the meeting because Page did not appear to be well versed on the issues facing the region.

“I had the impression he didn’t deal with these issues on a regular basis,” Megyesy said.

Page’s visit to Budapest drew notice from members of the House Intelligence Committee investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election. Hungary’s prime minister, who was the first world leader to endorse then-candidate Trump, has become increasingly aligned with Russian President Vladamir Putin, and Budapest is considered by experts to be a central hub for Russian intelligence activity.

When questioned by Rep. Adam Schiff of California, the ranking Democrat on the committee, during a hearing in early November, however, Page had only hazy memories of the trip. He said that he remembered seeing a Hungarian official, but he could not recall who it was.

“You don’t remember the names of anyone you met with or what their positions were in the Hungarian government?” Schiff asked, according to transcripts of the closed-door session.

“Not right now,” Page replied. “I can’t recall.”

Page told the members he could only barely remember the visit, saying “the detailed specifics of that are a distant memory,” but Schiff was incredulous.

“You went all the way to Budapest, and you can’t remember who you met with and what you hoped to accomplish?” he asked.

According to Megyesy, he spoke to Page in his office in the ornate parliament building, a sprawling landmark along the Danube River that draws legions of tourists. Their conversation covered a range of topics, Megyesy said, including the recent strain in relations between the U.S. and Hungary.

“I walked him through the politics and the issues with respect to Hungary,” Megyesy said.

Page held another meeting in Budapest, this one with Szemerkenyi, who was also in the city at the time, for coffee at a hotel, according to one person familiar with the meeting. Page initially met Szemerkenyi at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. The two met a third time in October at an embassy function in Washington, she said.

“When Mr. Page went to Budapest, I was on a scheduled visit back home and met with him for courtesy meetings,” Szemerkenyi told ABC News in a written statement. “Our conversations were friendly, discussing only general foreign policy issues.”

The infamous 35-page dossier detailing unverified intelligence gathered by a former British spy hired to dig up damaging information on then-candidate Trump, contains allegations that Page held secret meetings with Russian officials during a visit to Moscow in July. Page has flatly denied the dossier’s assertion and frequently derides the document as the “dodgy dossier.”

Megyesy said no outsiders attended his meeting with Page, but when Schiff asked Page directly if he met with any Russians during his visit to Hungary, his answer was a bit more vague.

“There may have been one Russian person passing through there,” Page responded. “But I have no recollection because it was totally immaterial and nothing serious was discussed.”

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Department of Homeland Security(WASHINGTON) -- Department of Homeland Security official Jamie Johnson resigned Thursday, stepping down from his role as director of faith-based and neighborhood partnerships for the DHS after his past comments on the black community and Islam surfaced.

On Thursday, CNN published the remarks, which Johnson made during radio appearances from 2008 to 2016. In a clip that CNN said is from 2008, he is asked why "a lot of blacks" are anti-Semitic.

"I think one of the reasons why is because Jewish people, from their coming to America in great waves in the early part of the 1800s, immediately rolled up their sleeves and began to work so hard and applied themselves to education and other means of improvement," Johnson responded, adding that the example is "an indictment of America's black community that has turned America's major cities into slums because of laziness, drug use and sexual promiscuity."

He differentiated between black people born in the United States with black immigrants, who he suggested are especially hard working.

On Iowa's "Mickelson in the Morning" radio show, Johnson said he agreed with the sentiment that "really all that Islam has ever given us is oil and dead bodies," according to a clip published by CNN.

Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Elaine Duke accepted his resignation Thursday.

"His comments were made prior to joining the Department of Homeland Security and clearly do not reflect the values of DHS and the administration," DHS acting press secretary Tyler Houlton told ABC News. "The department thanks him for his recent work assisting disaster victims and the interfaith community."

Johnson joined the DHS at the beginning of Trump's administration after working for his campaign in Iowa and was appointed by White House chief of staff John Kelly, who was the homeland security secretary at the time.

"Before accepting his appointment, he worked for many years in international humanitarian relief, helping charities provide food, water, clothing and medical care to those suffering from natural disaster, famine and poverty," read Johnson's DHS bio, which has been pulled from FEMA's website.

Johnson did not respond to a request for comment from ABC News.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Special Counsel Robert Mueller's team investigating whether President Donald Trump sought to obstruct a federal inquiry into connections between his presidential campaign and Russian operatives has now directed the Justice Department to turn over a broad array of documents, ABC News has learned.

In particular, Mueller's investigators are keen to obtain emails related to the firing of FBI Director James Comey and the earlier decision of Attorney General Jeff Sessions to recuse himself from the entire matter, according to a source who has not seen the specific request but was told about it.

Issued within the past month, the directive marks the special counsel's first records request to the Justice Department, and it means Mueller is now demanding documents from the department overseeing his investigation.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein played key roles in Comey's removal. And Sessions has since faced withering criticism from Trump over his recusal and Rosenstein's subsequent appointment of Mueller.

Mueller's investigators now seek not only communications between Justice Department officials themselves, but also any communications with White House counterparts, the source said. Before this request, investigators asked former senior Justice Department officials for information from their time at the department, ABC News was told.

The latest move suggests the Special Counsel is still actively digging into, among other matters, whether Trump or any other administration official improperly tried to influence an ongoing investigation.

Last month, Sessions told lawmakers he would cooperate with any requests from Mueller and is willing to meet with him.

"I want him to complete his investigation professionally," Sessions told the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Trump, however, has openly expressed disdain for the federal probe, and since his days on the campaign trail he has questioned the U.S. intelligence community's unanimous conclusion that Russia tried to meddle in last year's presidential election.

Shortly before firing Comey, Trump secretly drafted a memo laying out his reasons for wanting the FBI chief ousted. The New York Times described it as an "angry, meandering" missive.

The draft memo was never publicly released, but a copy was shared with Rosenstein, who had taken command of the Russia-related probe, according to the Times.

To publicly bolster Trump's decision on Comey, the White House released two memos written separately by Sessions and Rosenstein, with both faulting Comey for his handling of the FBI's probe into Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server.

During a House hearing in June, Rosenstein refused to say whether he consulted with the White House ahead of Comey's firing or whether anyone asked him to write his memo, insisting such questions "may well be within the scope of the special counsel's investigation."

Rosenstein still maintains final supervision over the case, even though he was interviewed by Mueller's team as a witness for his own role in Comey's firing.

Meanwhile, Trump has taken aim at Sessions for the recusal, launching such biting personal attacks months ago that it appeared as though Sessions possibly would not last the summer as attorney general.

At one point, Trump told reporters he wouldn't have nominated Sessions to run the Justice Department had he known the attorney general was going to give up oversight authority of the long-running investigation.

In July, Trump posted a Tweet demanding to know why "our beleaguered" attorney general wasn't "looking into Crooked Hillarys crimes & Russia relations."

In announcing his recusal four months earlier, Sessions said he and "senior career department officials" spent "several weeks" discussing whether his role as top foreign policy adviser to Trump's presidential campaign last year meant his "impartiality might reasonably be questioned."

His work leading the campaign's foreign policy team has left Sessions on the defensive in other ways.

Last week, Senate and House Democrats hammered Sessions for previously telling Congress -- under oath -- that no Trump campaign associates ever communicated with Russian operatives or intermediaries.

But in the first known charges brought by Mueller, announced last month, former campaign adviser George Papadopoulos admitted he told Sessions and Trump during a meeting last year that he was working with Russians to orchestrate a meeting between Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Some Democrats accused Sessions of deliberately lying to lawmakers, though Sessions has vehemently denied the charge, citing a memory lapse generated in part by the "chaos" of the campaign.

During a House hearing Wednesday, Sessions said he now remembers dismissing the adviser's proposal during the meeting last year.

Papadopoulos has pleaded guilty to charges of lying to the FBI about his contacts with Russian nationals.

Former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and his former business partner, Rick Gates, have been indicted on money-laundering and other charges tied to their previous lobbying efforts. They have each pleaded not guilty.

Meanwhile, other Trump associates, such as former National Security Adviser Mike Flynn, are still in Mueller's crosshairs.

Flynn was fired in February after then-Acting Attorney General Sally Yates informed White House officials that Flynn had lied to them about his own contacts with Russian officials.

A spokesman for Mueller declined to comment for this article. A spokeswoman for the Justice Department also declined to comment.

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- A key moderate Senate Republican said the Senate’s tax bill needs revisions before it is put to a vote.

"I want to see changes in that bill, and I think there will be changes," Sen. Susan Collins of Maine told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos on This Week Sunday.

She said one problem with the bill is the inclusion of a provision that would repeal the Affordable Care Act’s mandate that most people have health insurance.

Collins called that provision "the biggest mistake" in the tax act. "I hope it will be dropped," she said.

The Senate Finance Committee last week approved the Senate GOP leadership's tax-cut bill after the GOP-led House passed its version of a $1.5 trillion overhaul of business and personal taxes.

Republican congressional leaders want to get tax-cut legislation to the president to sign before Christmas.

Collins said she prefers the House version of the bill for some of its provisions, such as keeping the tax rate on people who make $1 million or more per year at 39.6 percent.

“That’s a change I’d like to see be made in the Senate bill so that we can skew more of the relief to middle-income taxes,” the senator said.

Other changes that Collins said she would like to see in the Senate version include making individual tax breaks, not just corporate tax breaks, permanent, she said.

"The House made both of them permanent," she said. "I think that is a far better way to go. I also think the reduction in the business tax rate is too steep, and that we could go to 22 percent, and then use that money, which is about $200 billion, to restore the tax deduction for state and local property taxes. That would really help middle-income taxpayers."

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ABC News(WASHINGTON)-- Carly Fiorina, a former CEO of Hewlett Packard who ran for the Republican nomination for president in 2016, said the current wave of sexual harassment allegations from Hollywood to Capitol Hill "will only be a watershed moment if men decide to step forward."

Fiorina told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos on This Week Sunday, "What needs to happen now is the guys need to man up, the guys who know this is happening."

"Most men are good, decent, respectful men. But enough men are not, and all the other men around them know they are not," said Fiorina, who was part of a "This Week" panel addressing the wave of sexual harassment and misconduct allegations. "I think it's men's turn now to say, 'You know what, we're not going to respect someone who disrespects women. And when that starts to happen, if that starts to happen, then we will have reached a watershed moment."

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Republican Sen. Susan Collins said sexual misconduct allegations against President Donald Trump that surfaced during the 2016 campaign "remain very disturbing."

"President Trump was not my choice for the Republican nominee for president, and I did not support him in part because of the way that all of these reports about how he was treating women," the Maine senator told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos on This Week Sunday. "He is president now and I’m working with him on some issues. But those allegations remain very disturbing."

At least 16 women have come forward alleging misconduct by Trump, ranging from sexual assault to harassment to inappropriate behavior.

Collins made her remarks after Stephanopoulos asked if she expected that the country will now see real change on sexual harassment with the current wave of allegations against prominent men from Hollywood to Washington, D.C.

The senator responded that one problem is that some of the women making the allegations are getting attacked. "Their credibility is undermined," she said.

Stephanopoulos brought up President Trump, saying, "More than a dozen women came forward during the campaign; [Trump] says that every single one of them are lying." "He did say that," Collins said.

At least eight women have accused Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore of sexual misconduct or inappropriate behavior, which Moore has repeatedly denied. Collins said she believes Moore’s accusers and hopes Alabama will not elect him to the Senate.

"I did not find him to be credible," Collins said of Moore. "As more and more allegations come forward, that adds to the weight of evidence against him. ... I hope that the good voters of Alabama decide not to send him to the United States Senate."

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Sen. Jeff Flake, a frequent sparring partner of President Donald Trump, continues to make enemies in his own party after calling the GOP "toast" while unaware he was still on a live mic.

Flake, R-Ariz., was at a tax reform event in Mesa, Arizona on Friday night when he was caught bashing the president in a conversation with friend, Mesa Mayor John Giles.

"If we become the party of Roy Moore and Donald Trump, we are toast," Flake was caught saying by ABC affiliate KNXV-TV.

Moore is running for the vacant Senate seat in Alabama left by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. He has come under fire for a number of allegations of sexual harassment and assault, but has refused to leave the race.

Trump is a frequent opponent for Flake, who announced last month he would not seek re-election in 2018 in a fiery speech condemning the president from the floor of the Senate.

Flake indirectly called out Trump in his Senate speech, saying, "We must dedicate ourselves to making sure that the anomalies never becomes the normal, with respect and humility."

He told ABC News' Mary Bruce of Moore in a Nov. 9 interview on Capitol Hill, "If there is any shred of truth to these stories, he ought to step aside. And now."

Flake's criticism of Trump and the GOP weren't the only interesting comments to be caught on the live mic Friday night.

Giles was caught appearing to encourage Flake to run for president in 2020.

"I am not throwing smoke at you, but you are the guy -- just for fun, think about how much fun it would be -- just to be the foil, you know, and point out what an idiot this guy is," Giles said, apparently referring to Trump. "Anyway, I hope you do it."

Giles, who is a moderate Republican like Flake, has been mayor of Mesa since 2014.

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images(MONTGOMERY, Ala.) -- The wife of embattled Alabama GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore continued a fierce pushback against allegations of sexual misconduct and impropriety against her husband, holding
a press conference on Friday with other conservative Alabama women at the state capitol in Montgomery.

"The people of Alabama understand what's going on here. My husband, Judge Roy Moore is fighting for the people of Alabama and has been fighting for over 30 years. The people of Alabama know him,
they have seen what he has done," Kayla Moore said.

Kayla Moore also said, apparently ironically, that she believes President Donald Trump owes her and her husband a thank you for diverting public attention from the federal investigation into
Russia's alleged interference in the 2016 presidential campaign and possible collusion with Trump associates.

"So the liberal press, Washington Post, who endorsed Hillary Clinton, who also endorsed our opponent gets involved in this race, along with the Human Rights Campaign, the DNC and the Washington
establishment, all of the very same people who were attacking President Trump are also attacking us," Kayla Moore said, "I personally think he owes us a thank you. Have you noticed you're not
hearing too much about Russia?"

Beginning with allegations against Roy Moore that were first reported by the Washington Post late last week and continued this week with other women coming forward, a total of eight women have
accused Roy Moore of sexual misconduct or impropriety.

He has strongly denied the allegations, most recently saying at a press conference Thursday, "They're not only untrue, but they have no evidence to support them."

With the Dec. 12 special election for the seat once held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions drawing closer, Kayla Moore and the other women who spoke at today's press conference also took the chance
to blast the Democrat in the race, former U.S. Attorney Doug Jones. They said Jones is an "ultra-liberal" whose positions on abortion rights and transgender rights are, they said, not
representative of Alabamians.

"If a far-left liberal Democratic Doug Jones is elected, America is the victim," said one of the speakers, Ann Eubank, legislative chair for Alabama Legislative Watchdogs.

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US Senate Photographic Studio(WASHINGTON) -- Top leaders in the Senate are calling for a Senate Ethics Committee review of Senator Al Franken, D-Minn., who was recently accused of forcibly kissing a woman and appearing to grope her while she slept.

The committee has not announced whether it will pursue a preliminary inquiry into the alleged incidents, which took place before he joined the Senate when he was on an overseas USO tour, but Franken has welcomed an investigation, saying he’d “gladly cooperate.” Franken has also apologized to his accuser, saying he remembers their encounter differently but is "ashamed that my actions ruined that experience for you."

On Thursday, the committee announced it would resume its preliminary inquiry into misconduct by Senator Bob Menendez, D-N.J., whose federal bribery trial ended in a mistrial. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has also said if Republican Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore is elected in December to fill Attorney General Jeff Sessions' empty seat, he would likely face an ethics review given the allegations of sexual misconduct against him. Moore has denied all the allegations.

Here’s a look at how a Senate Ethics Committee review would unfold, if and when one occurs:

Who serves on the committee?

There are six members on the committee -- Chair Johnny Isakson, R-Ga.; Vice Chair Chris Coons, D-Del.; Sen. Jim Risch, R-Ind.; Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan.; Sen. Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii; and Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H.

Launching a preliminary inquiry

Upon the receipt of a complaint or allegation of misconduct, the committee would first decide whether to conduct a preliminary inquiry to determine whether a violation occurred.

A preliminary inquiry is similar to grand jury proceedings and could include interviews, subpoenas and depositions. It could last as long or short as the committee needs to conduct its fact-finding.

After receiving a final confidential report with the findings and recommendations, the committee would then vote to either dismiss the matter, issue a public or private letter of admonition, or to begin an adjudicatory review.

Conducting an adjudicatory review

According to the committee's Rules of Procedure, an adjudicatory review is conducted after finding “there is substantial cause for the committee to conclude that a violation within the jurisdiction of the committee has occurred.”

An adjudicatory review can be performed by outside counsel or by the committee staff. It would consist of interviews and sworn statements and could include a public hearing.

Upon completion of the review and following a final report, the committee would prepare a report for the Senate, which would include a recommendation if disciplinary action should be pursued. The final report and recommendation of the committee would then be made public, unless the committee votes to keep it confidential.

Potential disciplinary action

Potential disciplinary action recommendations could include expulsion, censure and/or payment of restitution. Expulsion would require a two-thirds vote in the Senate.

Does the committee have jurisdiction to look into pre-Senate allegations?

The allegations against Franken occurred prior to his becoming a U.S. senator. Would the committee still have jurisdiction in a case predating someone's time in the Senate?

The answer is yes - but it hasn’t happened in modern times, according to Robert Walker, who previously served as chief counsel and staff director on the Senate Ethics Committee from 2003 to 2008.

Walker said he’s unaware of any modern ethics inquiry that stemmed from allegations predating a senator’s time in office but says the committee has left open its ability to consider cases prior to one’s service.

“The committee has specifically left this an open issue such that in any given case it's up to the committee whether they want to look into pre-Senate conduct,” he said.

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petervician/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump will be presented with the recommendation to finance and sell anti-tank missiles to the Ukrainian government — a move aimed at deterring aggression from pro-Russian separatists, a State Department official told ABC News.

The National Security Council decided during a meeting on Tuesday to greenlight the presentation of a $47 million grant package to the Ukrainian government to purchase American defense arms, including the powerful Javelin anti-tank missiles.

The president and Congress must approve the sale of anti-tank missiles. The Javelin, a portable missile with a steep price-tag, has been described as "The American Military's Anti-Tank Killer."

If Trump approves the arms deal, it would be a major shift from the party platform on sending lethal weapons to Ukraine, which was amended when Trump was the party's nominee for president, from supporting "lethal defensive arms" to Ukraine to the more vague "appropriate assistance” -- language that ran counter to the perspective of many of the organization’s Republicans.

"They softened it, I heard, but I was not involved," Trump said of his campaign in an interview with ABC News's George Stephanopoulos at the time, before adding, "The people of Crimea, from what I've heard, would rather be with Russia than where they were."

Trump's then-campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, had worked for years for the pro-Russian Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych, who was expelled in a popular uprising in 2014.

Russia invaded Crimea and sent troops and arms into eastern Ukraine shortly after his ouster, leading to a conflict that rages on to this day. The Obama administration never provided arms assistance to Ukraine in response.

A former Trump White House official and adviser to the president expressed concern to ABC News that arming Ukraine would inflame tensions in the region and aggravate America’s fragile relationship with Russia.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Defense Secretary Gen. James Mattis have been in discussions since June about how to best make the sale. They strongly recommended the decision to finance and sell anti-tank missiles to Ukraine above two other options that would aid in the arming of Ukraine.

The State Department official added that, in the upcoming weeks, there will be a meeting to discuss the public messaging on the sale — feedback that will be included in the eventual decision.

But a White House official cautioned that they are not ready to make their decision public.

"We have no announcement at this time," National Security Council spokesperson Michael Anton told ABC News in an email.

The State Department was equally non-committal. "The United States has neither provided defensive weapons nor ruled out the option of doing so," a State Department spokesperson told ABC News.

Ukrainian officials have been publicly optimistic about relations with the United States.

"We are really satisfied with the acceleration of U.S.-Ukraine relations at the moment," Artur Gerasymov, a member of the Ukrainian parliament and chairman of a military subcommittee, told the publication Foreign Policy in late October.

Mattis stressed the administration's desire to strengthen ties with Ukraine in an August press conference in Kiev with President Petro Poroshenko.

"This permits me, better informed, to go back and advocate for what I believe you need, as brought to me by your minister of defense and, certainly, your president," Mattis said. "For example, we've just approved -- just very recently, last couple of weeks -- another $175 million worth of equipment, including some specialized equipment that can be used to help defend the country, bringing to a total of nearly $750 million in the last several years."

He added, at the time, that U.S. military leadership has been reviewing the American position on providing defensive lethal weapons.

"I would also point out that, on the defensive lethal weapons ... we are actively reviewing it," Mattis said. "I will go back, now, having seen the current situation, and be able to inform the secretary of state and the president in very specific terms what I recommend for the direction ahead."

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MD WAZID HOSSAIN/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump has announced that his administration's plan to reverse a ban on big game trophies has been put on hold so he can "review all conservation facts."

On Wednesday, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service official confirmed to ABC News that the Trump administration had planned to allow hunters to bring trophies of elephants they killed in Zimbabwe and
Zambia back to the United States.

However, Trump wrote on Twitter Friday evening that the decision had been placed on hold.

U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke followed Trump's tweet with a statement echoing that the administration believes conservation is "critical" and issuing permits would be delayed.

"President Trump and I have talked and both believe that conservation and healthy herds are critical," Zinke said in a statement Friday night. "As a result, in a manner compliant with all applicable laws, rules and regulations, the issuing of permits is being put on hold as the decision is being reviewed."

The proposed reversal was met with widespread backlash, with celebrities and public figures taking to social media to criticize the president.

The ban on big game trophies had been put in place by the Obama administration in 2014.

Elephants are listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act, but a provision in the act allows the government to give permits to import such trophies if there is evidence that the hunting
benefits conversation of the species.

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flySnow/iStock/thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Are taxpayers footing the bill for workplace settlements on Capitol Hill?

Earlier this week, Rep. Jackie Speier, D-Calif., told MSNBC that Congress has paid out more than $15 million to settle harassment claims over the last 10 to 15 years.

An aide to Speier -- who is leading the charge on Capitol Hill to reform anti-harassment training and the complaint process -- later clarified that the figure included all workplace complaint
settlements. But the congresswoman’s comments raised questions about settlement payments in Congress.

How much money has been paid out?

Congress has paid $17.24 million for 264 settlements between 1997 and 2017, according to the congressional Office of Compliance, the legislative branch’s workplace administration office.

An OOC official told ABC News that most of the complaints are not related to sexual harassment, but also include other workplace issues regarding racial discrimination, overtime, and family and
medical leave, among others.

In a fact sheet explaining the claims process released Thursday, the OOC said a “large portion” of the cases come from “employing offices in the legislative branch other than the House of
Representatives or the Senate.”

“The statistics on payments are not further broken down because settlements may involve cases that allege violations of more than one of the 13 statutes incorporated by the [Congressional
Accountability Act],” the OCC wrote in the fact sheet.

In short, it’s not clear how much of that $17 million has been used to settle sexual harassment complaints on Capitol Hill.

Where does the money come from?

The settlement payments come from the U.S. Treasury, according to the terms of the Congressional Accountability Act of 1995, the marque congressional labor and accountability legislation governing
work in the legislative branch.

The CAA appropriates “such sums as may be necessary to pay such awards and settlements,” which are all approved by the executive director of the OCC.

Speier, who has introduced the Me Too Congress Act with Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., would require lawmakers repay the U.S. Treasury for any sexual harassment settlements and make their names
public.

"I think it's going to clean up a lot of people's acts," she told ABC News' Mary Bruce in an interview.

Who approves the payment?

Any payments regarding House employees must be approved by leaders of the House Administration Committee, according to a committee aide.

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